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Splashing Time At Ulu Geruntum Waterfall

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    Ulu Geruntum waterfall

    What tourists are saying about Ulu Geruntum Waterfall

    “Simply beautiful!”

    We took a walk up to the waterfall which is bit of a hike. It really is worth the extra walk up just be careful on the paths as they can be quite slippery.

    There is no entrance fee for the falls. The walk up to the falls took us about 20 minutes but there are plenty of points to stop and have a seat.

    Once at the top it’s lovely to take a dip in the crystal clear water and slide down the rocks if you’re brave enough.

    Visited November 2015

    ulu geruntum waterfall

    There are lots of things that you can do at the waterfall such as having a picnic, swimming, fishing and team building.

    “Breathtaking and amazing!”

    It is a nice place for swimming and the views are also very captivating.

    We would recommend to go early in the morning and go straight up the hill to upper water falls. The hike took us sometime to reach.

    There you can swim also in small ponds and slide in natural water slides, those are very fun and refreshing! The biggest slide has a whirl in the end of the slide, which you must take in count when you slide in.

    It is nothing scary, but with less fit and/or alert people it would be good idea to have another person waiting in the end of the slide to help you to get out of the whirl.

    On the way down to lower level we actually spotted wild Great Hornbills, which was super fantastic bonus.

    Visited November 2015

    ulu geruntum waterfall

    If you love adventure, this waterfall is your best bet.

    “Beautiful and yet dangerous!”

    Tallest waterfalls I have ever seen, we were tired from a long worthless journey and were thinking to skip the last sight.

    But we decided to go since it was just next to our hotel, a bit of a long hike to reach the sight but once you are there its totally worth it.

    It was breathtaking for me I couldn’t stop looking, we stayed there for more than an hour, the weather was a bit rainy and the rocks were slippery but the view was mesmerizing.

    Visited August 2015

    ulu geruntum waterfall

    If you haven’t tried abseiling from a waterfall before, the Ulu Geruntum waterfall provides a great opportunity for you to do so.

    “A nice little adventure to the waterfall”

    This cute waterfall is well worth the 400-500 hundred steps it takes to get there. There is one waterfall about half way up but the second one at the top has a few small pools that are ideal for having a cool down.

    If brave enough you can slide down part for the rock into one of the pools!

    If you really want a challenge follow the trek path near the waterfall to the top of the mountain – its 2-3 hours of a tough climb ( some part with ropes!) Will need some decent shoes and a good level of fitness.

    Visited October 2015

    About Ulu Geruntum Waterfall

    Abseiling from a waterfall provides a thrilling but wet adventure.
    Source: The Star

    Poised and roped at the top of a gushing waterfall, a petite lady trembled with fear as she looked over the edge.

    “Oh God, I can’t do it. There’s no way I am going down!” she exclaimed.

    How to abseil down a waterfall


    After much cajoling and assurance by James Chee, one of the organizers, she finally conquered her nerves and abseiled down the waterfall, none the worse for wear.

    She was among 30 participants at the Ulu Geruntum waterfall in Gopeng, Perak. Earlier in the day, they had white water rafted down the Kampar river rapids.

    These young people with similar interests were brought together through the social networking website Facebook.


    Ulu Geruntum waterfall abseiling

    James Chee instructing an abseiler on what to do.


    The day’s participants were given a briefing on the equipment and technique of abseiling by the well qualified river guides. Each person had to wear a safety helmet used for rock climbing, a seat harness and a carabiner with a “figure of eight” descender.

    “Lean back and let the harness take your weight. Walk backwards with feet apart to maintain balance,” advised Senz, one of the guides.

    “Keep your legs about 90 degrees to the wall. If your legs are higher and you slip . . . you will be dangling upside down. If your legs are lower, slip . . . you will kiss the wall!” was how he ended the briefing.

    The adventure began from the waterfall

    The enthusiastic but apprehensive adventure seekers made their way up a 10m slope to the top of the waterfall. Two static lines (abseil ropes) and two safety lines were already securely anchored to two trees.

    Each abseiler was attached to the static line that ran through the descender connected to the seat harness via a carabiner.

    The rate of descent is controlled by feeding the lower part of the static line through the descender.

    “To stop descending, just pull the lower end,” explained Chee, a senior partner in Riverbug, the company which organized this white water rafting and abseiling package.

    Abseiling tips


    Ulu Geruntum waterfall abseiling

    A good kind of deluge.


    “We use the double belay system for safety. The top belay safety line is controlled by the guide at the top of the waterfall and the bottom belay abseil rope is held by another guide at the base of the fall. In the event the abseiling participant lets go both his/her hands, the double belay will check the free fall,” explained Chee.

    Soon it was my turn to take the plunge. I looked nervously at the 10.5mm abseil rope as Chee hooked it to my harness.


    Chee assured me, “Don’t worry, that rope is made of braided nylon with a protective sheath, and the safety load is 2,200kg. Don’t forget we have a safety line on your harness, too.”

    “Wow!” I thought to myself. “A load of 2,200kg? That’s the weight of an elephant! I am safe!”

    As I walked hesitantly backwards over the edge, Senz’s briefing came to mind. The moment I hit the cascading water, I tried to assume the posture taught to us. Somehow the forceful, streaming wall of cold water erased all my fears, as if washing it away.


    When I slowly plied the abseil rope through the descender to lower myself, I felt like a small kid running in the rain. Mum, however, was not around anymore to show her displeasure at my antics.

    A few minutes later, I was at the bottom of the waterfall, still standing upright on my feet! I did it! It was over all too soon.

    Max, the belayer at the bottom of the waterfall was on hand to detach the abseil rope and safety line.


    waterfall abseiling

    Abseiling from a waterfall provides a thrilling but wet adventure.


    Experience is similar to rock climbing

    Two ropes had been attached to several anchor points at the base of the waterfall to prevent participants from falling into the swift water if they slipped while walking back to dry ground.

    Riverbug entertains requests for one or two repeat attempts by their clients if time permits, especially when a smaller group is involved.

    For experienced rock climbers who are familiar with abseiling, this activity should be a piece of cake. For those not yet initiated, it is a unique wet adventure.

    Getting to Ulu Geruntum Waterfall

    Ulu Geruntum Waterfall is accessible via a narrow metal road about half an hour’s drive from Gopeng town in Perak.

    Riverbug has been running white water rafting in Gopeng since 2005. In 2006, they added waterfall abseiling as a package for day trippers.

    Get more details by calling 012-3131006 (Hotline/Fara), 012-2205145 (James Chee) or visiting http://www.traversetours.com.

    Other waterfalls that you might be interested to go

    • Tips for Surviving Deadly Waterfalls – If you are frequent visitor to waterfall, watch out. There might be some lurking dangers that you may not know. Here are some tips on how to play safely at waterfall.
    • Chilling Falls, Selangor – Prepare to get wet here, even if you don’t plan on swimming! This is because visitors have to make five (shallow to deep) river crossings to get to this multiple cascade.
    • Jerangkang Falls, Pahang – This endless succession of over 40 blue-green cascades is one of nature’s finest.
    • Lata Kinjang, Perak – These dramatic 300m cascades, which can be seen from the North-South Highway, hold the top prize for being one of the tallest waterfalls in Malaysia.
    • Pos Dipang, Perak – Being a recent discovery, Pos Dipang is still relatively uncharted and therefore unspoilt.
    • Seminyang Falls, Pahang – Having only a single tier does not make Seminyang any less astounding. But beware: this powerful and roaring waterfall is no child’s play.
    • Wang Buloh Caves Pulau Tuba – DURING the Japanese Invasion some 70 years ago, the villagers of Pulau Tuba in Langkawi escaped persecution and death when they found sanctuary in the caves of Wang Buloh.

    Photo credits: Conny Sandland, nadi0.

    Driving Direction, Location and Map to Ulu Geruntum Waterfall


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