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A Wonderful Place to Experience Traditional Malaysia

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    kuala medang

    What tourists are saying about homestay at Kuala Medang

    “Wonderful place to experience traditional Malaysia”

    I recently spent two nights at the homestay. It was a terrific experience and an opportunity to observe and interact in a traditional Malay setting.

    Watti worked very hard preparing food each day, which was excellent. Ahmad was also working the land and inspiration to observe.

    My guide Faiz was very good and made sure that I was able to experience all I wanted: see paddys, farm land, local markets, fishing village, harvesting palm fruit, agriculture research, and much more.

    Visit March 2014

    kuala medang homestay

    A homestay experience for a family from Korea.

    “Homely sanctuary”

    This place is the perfect hideout from your normal bustle of the city.

    Rooms might not be top notch, food might not be Michelin grade but its the imperfections that crafted its perfection.

    Overall, you will feel at home, but in a village. Hiding from your boss?

    Perfect, because its not easy to find this place and you can put aside all your gadgets and go exploring the nearby estate which is also part of the homestay and go see ponies graze the fields or finding fruits that are in season.

    Visited July 2015

    “Quiet, nice family, great service”

    This is a perfect place if you are a family or just want a little escape from the busy hotels in the touristic areas.

    I’d recommend a car if you plan to stay longer. If you do have a car it is a great location to explore everything in and around Kuala Medang.

    The family who drives the place is very warm and welcoming.

    Visited July 2014

    “Homestay with a kampung experience”

    If you don’t mind insects creeping around the property and some in your rooms, this homestay provides clean basic facilities, with value for money local meals that can be added on.

    There are fruit trees, berries shrubs, an animal paddock, small river in the property so this is a nice kampung (village) feel homestay for those from the cities.

    Some parts of the property are not child-proof so adults supervision is required if young children are around.

    If comfort and luxurious amenities are in your agenda then this is not the place for you.

    Visited November 2014

    “An escape from city!”

    I have been there for my research. It was a clean and well-managed homestay, surrounded by huge well-preseved land.

    The staff there was so nice. We were having great experience with the homestay, with short jungle trekking and plucking the rambutan in its own orchard!

    However, for other activities and meal, early booking required. The price is reasonable too!!

    Visited January 2014

    kuala medang homestay

    Kuala Medang homestay.

    About Kuala Medang, Pahang

    Kuala Medang is where homestay visitors can get an old-fashioned village experience without compromising on modern comforts.

    VISITING Kuala Medang in central Pahang is almost a walk down memory lane as visitors can see village life as in the old days and how food was prepared traditionally.

    Welcoming ceremony

    Welcomed by villages with the kompang (drum), bunga manggar (floral stick) and sirih junjung (decorated beetle leaf), we were given refreshing young coconuts to drink.

    Then we were introduced to our foster families, followed by a short ride in long boats along the wide, fast flowing Jelai River to Kampung Sungai Serau to visit cottage industries there making bertih, emping, jus buah kabong, jeli kelapa, kordial buah salak and dodol.

    Bertih (parched rice or popped rice) and emping (rice flakes) were made from freshly harvested rice.

    What to see at Kuala Medang

    We saw the harvesting of rice with a tuai (a special hand-held metal clip with wooden handle) instead of the sabit (sickle).

    Tuai in Malay means ‘to harvest’ and the instrument is traditionally favoured over the sickle so as not to anger the padi guardian spirit.

    Old women demonstrated husking the rice using a lesung kaki (wooden foot mortar) and winnowing with a dulang (bamboo tray).

    kuala medang homestay

    Padi fields at Kuala Medang.

    Another woman showed how dodol was made. The sweet brown sticky snack was made with glutinous rice flour and sugar and required hours of patient stirring over a slow fire. Jeli kelapa is agar-agar jelly made with young coconut flesh.

    From the tall enau palm, villagers harvest the kabong fruit to make sweet drinks.

    This is usually sold at the Bazaar Ramadan during the fasting month. Salak is another type of palm about two metres tall with scaly-skinned fruit growing in bunches. Before this trip, I was under the impression that salak only came from Indonesia.

    kuala medang homestay

    Our dinner at the homestay.

    In Pahang it is grown as a cash crop. We not only enjoyed eating the slightly sour ripe fruit but we also sampled ice-blended salak cordial. Nice.

    Attractions at Kuala Medang

    We were jolted back to the present in the village where traditional wooden houses had all the modern amenities including electricity, running water, refrigerators and even Astro dishes on the roof!

    Kuala Medang is a relatively new settlement consisting of some 200 families. Formerly forest, there is now a small community of farmers there whose income is supplemented by members of their families working in other parts of the country.

    The pekas sehari (weekly market) is held where the wreck of a Japanese World War II plane was found three decades ago. It was sold for scrap metal.

    kuala medang homestay

    You can find some really beautiful waterfalls at Kuala Medang.

    Kuala Medang is the second homestay village in Pahang, after Kampung Desa Murni in Temerloh. They have hosted visitors from more than 30 countries.

    Getting to Kuala Medang

    Our journey started at the train station in Kuala Lumpur. The group comprised people in the travel trade as well as the media visiting Kuala Lipis under the “Moh Melawat Pahang” campaign.

    Pahang State chairman for Tourism and Women’s Affair Committee Datuk Maznah Mazlan came along. With an endless supply of food and drinks as well as karaoke, there was never a dull moment on board the train.

    Maznah even suggested to KTMB’s inter city services department’s director Sarbini Tijan that train-themed songs be compiled and played on special occasions like this as there were many such songs in various languages.

    Attractions in Pahang that you might be interested

    • Genting Highlands – Genting Highlands is one of the most popular tourist destination in Malaysia. It’s one of the best city of entertainment. Head out to this highlands township for a cool and refreshing day.
    • Bukit Tinggi Resort – This 16,000-acr retreat captures the essence of different cultures of the world in a single destination. The main attraction here is Colmar Tropicale, a French-themed resort town.
    • Cherating – This is a seaside destination long popular with budget travelers. It is the site of Asia’s first Club Med and the charming Cherating Village.
    • Fraser Hill – This quiet getaway is akin to a little Scottish hamlet with granite-colored mock-Tudor buildings dotting the landscape.
    • Cameron Highlands – Known for its tea plantation and various plan gardens. It’s one of the best places for a family trip. The place is well known for its refreshing air and temperate climate.
    • Janda Baik Homestay – There is nothing like taking a break from the busy city life by relaxing in kampung Janda Baik under the homestay programme which features traditional Malay life at the village, authentic Malay food and some wild fruits.
    • Endau-Rompin State Park – This is the second largest national park in Peninsular Malaysia, named after the Endau and Rompin Rivers that flow through the park.

    Photo credits: Dan Woods, MacKensie Cornelius, raichovak, tian yake, Nicolas, Muse Rosli.

    Location, Driving Direction and Map to Kuala Medang

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